Opinion

The New Brumaire: On Clintonite Fantasy

By Jenkin Benson ’17 bensonje@grinnell.edu Sometime in the latter third of the 20th Century, the Democratic Party lost its vision. A managerial enclave of neoliberals that have eschewed redistributive campaigns in favor of free market idealisms, police apparatuses and cosmetic multiculturalism has replaced the Social Democrats of the modernist era. The ideological transition from the…

Opinion: Casualties of Grinnell’s Decorative Allyship

When the first travel ban was instituted, President Kington sent an email to the entire campus and a second email to the impacted students. In addition, countless faculty and staff members reached out and, of course, there was that incredibly touching video that reminded international students that they are welcome here. I was moved and…

The R(ead)sling List: Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

By Emma Soberano ’17 soberano@grinnell.edu Yaa Gyasi’s “Homegoing” is more than a collection of short stories shaped into a novel: it is a family tree, whose trunk is split at the base but which rises, strong, for generations. At the root of the story are Effia and Esi, Ghanaian half-sisters separated by the eighteenth century’s…

Life During Wartime: Authorities on Democracy

By Max Fenton ’19 fentonma@grinnell.edu We are six weeks into the Trump presidency, and politics have already radically changed. Whether it is the cascades of information pouring from the White House, the administration’s blatant hostility towards the press, or President Trump’s own lack of political or military pedigree, all observers of politics can singly agree…

Ken Adelman: unwelcome then, unwelcome now.

“Immediately five or six guys, led by [Ken] Adelman and supported by “Brow,” forced their way into the room, despite the efforts of both Adrienne [Lemmons] and David [Dillon] to resist them at the door” In 1967, the College’s Interim Student Court “socially expelled” Kenneth Lee Adelman, a now successful diplomat and author, for throwing…

The R(ead)sling List: Neil Gaiman

By Emma Soberano soberano17@grinnell.edu Neil Gaiman is known for writing modern magical realism, and this week’s novel, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, is no exception. Though the narrator is a middle-aged man returning home for a funeral, much of the book centers on a brief and incredible experience in his childhood. The…

The New Brumaire: Shining Hegemony

By Jenkin Benson ’17 bensonje17@grinnell.edu When left-leaning people reflect upon the isolationism of the United States in the years prior to the Holocaust, disbelief and disappointment are common reactions. How could the American government callously refuse to take in Jewish refugees at the onset of a genocidal World War? These same types must similarly be…

Life During Wartime: Unreasonable Science

By Max Fenton ’19 fentonma@grinnell.edu An odd education policy debate has raged in state legislatures for the past year — whether or not computer-coding classes should be as treated a foreign language. After all, computers speak their own kind of language, and coding is a valuable skill both as a form of communication and as…