Arts

In the dollhouse

Jeff Malmberg’s recent documentary “Marwencol” is one of many films this year that celebrate society’s outcasts and individualists. It sits nicely alongside films like “The Social Network,” “Exit Through the Gift Shop,” “Winter’s Bone,” “127 Hours” and “True Grit”—all films about peculiar or defiant individuals who surmount overwhelming external circumstances in order to doggedly choose…

Locating Gen Y’s utopia, in four acts

Sam Green, a San Francisco-based documentarian and Academy Award nominated filmmaker will present his most recent project, “Utopia in Four Movements” this Sunday. Feb. 13, at 7:30 p.m. in Harris Cinema. The documentary will be a live performance, with narration provided by Green and live music from Dave Cerf and band, the Quavers. Green has…

Artist manipulates famous works into critiques

By Esther Howe & Lauren Teixeira  Jiri Anderle’s prints are creepy. Disembodied faces emerge distorted and pained, stretched and hollow across the pages of his prints. Bulbous forms ricochet across his compositions, shaped like limbs, organs, or some combination of the two. Marfa Prokhorova ’12, the Faulconer Gallery Intern last fall, suggests that these prints express…

Professor explores the intricacies of shorthand

By Tessa Cheek To say that “Kind Favor, Kind Letter,” one of the exhibits opening today, Friday, Jan. 28 in Faulconer Gallery, is light, or even that it is brave—bravely springy for the season, brave in its loveliness—is perhaps to miss one of its fundamental features. In its heights, its delicacies and its sheer interconnectedness,…

Artist ignites Faulconer with smoke paintings

By Christopher Squier  The Faulconer Gallery will be haunted by ghosts from South Africa with its newest exhibit, Diane Victor’s “Of Fables and Follies.” South African artist Victor begins a stay at Grinnell as artist-in-residence with the opening today, of her collection of drawings made in smoke, ashes and dust opening today. Victor, who was…

Blending the perverse with the everyday

“Rear Window” is probably Alfred Hitchcock’s most popular film, and its popularity is well deserved—one could argue that it is his masterpiece. It isn’t as seamlessly crafted as “Notorious,” or as provocative as “Psycho,” or as singular and dreamlike as “Vertigo,” my personal favorite. But “Rear Window” remains the film that best synthesizes Hitchcock’s defining…