Trustees visit campus

Trustees - Jon Sundby

Michael Kahn ’74 talks to students about the people who have inspired him. Photo by Jon Sundby.

Jon Sundby, News Editor

sundbyjo17@grinnell.edu

On Thursday, Oct. 8, Grinnell’s Board of Trustees arrived on campus for one of their four annual meetings. During their brief stay until Oct. 10, the Board will attend multiple meetings and discuss a myriad of issues relating to the financial and academic well-being of the school. Some of the issues that will be reviewed during this session will be the new renovations of the Alumni Recitation Hall and Carnegie as well as a vote on whether to extend our policy of need-blind admission.

Their stay began on Thursday morning, with a ceremony held to honor the new faculty chairs appointments. After that, they began their series of meetings and events, including a presentation by Professor David Cook-Martin, Sociology, and a reception to celebrate the late Vernon E. Faulconer, a former Board member.

That evening, the Student Government Association (SGA) hosted a meet-and-greet for students and trustees to get to know each other better and communicate about life on campus.

In addition to the meet-and-greet, student representatives from the SGA cabinet will meet with the trustees for a dinner on Friday night, where they hope to illuminate what life is like for students on campus.

“We urge all students to either go out to the meet-and-greet, talk to one of the execs or really talk to anyone on cabinet, because we really will have a lot of exposure to the trustees,” said Dan Davis ’16, President of SGA.

During their time here trustees will tackle a lot of issues relating to the financial health of the college, but perhaps their most impactful vote will be on whether to extend the College’s policy of using need-blind admission for another three years. The Board will vote on the policy on Friday. Although this has been a contentious issue in the past, Davis predicted that the vote would almost certainly end up being in favor of sustaining the policy.